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Winter does the Mulch Mash

Last fall, we gathered up all the leaves we could easily get our hands on, and then we laid down a thick layer over our garden beds. We raked our yard a couple times as well as helping ourselves to the leaves raked into the street by unsuspecting neighbors (see Confessions of a Leaf Thief for more details).
compactedleaves1

The result was a thick colorful blanket covering the garden beds. The weather cooperated, sending rain and more rain to hold down the leaves, rather than winds which would have helped us “share” them again with our neighbors. Snow soon followed– and lots of snow at that.

compactedleaves2

Now that the blanket of snow that covered our yard and Michigan for most of the last 4 months has disappeared, our leaf blanket has been revealed and we are delighted with the changes the weather has brought about.

compactedleaves3

The fall colors are obviously muted and the leaves are compacted closely. Since we use the all-over, year-round mulch method, we are off to a good start for the not-too-distant planting season. We’ll simply pull back the mulch, dig the holes, and add our seeds or seedlings, as the case may be. Our mulch will both feed the soil and discourage the weeds. It’s been a long winter indeed, but winter has been on our side, doing the mash and helping us mulch our garden.

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Continuing the Discussion

  1. A Blanket of Leaves Tucks in the Garden | Our Twenty Minute Kitchen Garden linked to this post on November 6, 2010

    […] as a natural fence for keeping the leaves corralled on the bed. In a couple of rains and frosts, the leaves start to mash down enough that they are no longer in danger of blowing away. It’s another sign that the garden is […]

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